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Reviews > Clothing > Jackets > Dickies Pro Jasper Extreme Coat > Test Report by Coy Ray Starnes


Williamson-Dickies Mfg. Co., LLC. Pro Jasper Extreme Coat
Special Note: also reviewing two liner jackets
Review by Coy Starnes

Initial Report: November 10, 2018
Field Report: January 18, 2019
Long Term Report: later date



Tester Coy Starnes
Gender Male
Age 56
Weight 250 lb (113 kg)
Height 5' 11" (1.8 m)
Chest 45 in (114 cm)
E-Mail starnescr@yahoo.com
Location Grant Alabama USA

Tester Biography
I live in Northeast Alabama.  I enjoy backpacking, hunting, fishing and kayaking.  I enjoy hiking with family and friends but also hike solo occasionally.  Most of my hiking has been in the Southeastern US. I hike throughout the year but actually enjoy late fall or early spring the most with some winter hiking mixed in. I don't like the hot and humid weather of summer unless I can escape to the mountains where it is cooler.  My style is slow and steady and my gear is light.  I will sacrifice weight for comfort and durability to a degree. A typical 3-season load for me is around 20 lb (9 kg) not counting food and water.

Initial Report: November 10, 2018

General Product Information
Manufacture Williamson-Dickies Mfg. Co., LLC.
Year of Manufacture 2018
URL http://www.dickies.com/


Dickies Pro Jasper Extreme
Size tested XL
Listed Weight none given
Measured Weight 2 lb (920 g)
Shell Material 100% nylon
Liner Material 100% mesh polyester
Color Gravel Gray
MSRP 99.99 - 109.99 USD (size dependent)


Dickies Pro Jasper Extreme
                                                         Dickies Pro Jasper Extreme

Product Description
As I stated at the top, I will be reviewing three jackets.  I’ll start with the Jasper Extreme.  It serves as the outer jacket when wearing either of the other two jackets under it but any of the three can be worn alone.  Although not designed as a triple layering system, I found I could wear all three together, but felt like the Michelin Man...  Anyways, I’ll wear each jacket or jacket combination depending on conditions in the field.  

The Jasper is waterproof so it can serve as a rain jacket by itself in warmer weather. The hood is removable. It has pockets galore. I counted seven total.  The three on the inside are big enough for a large wallet or cell phone and one has a media cord port.  The outer pockets are similar in size.  The lower two hand pockets are zippered but have an overlapping flap positioned in such a way to protect contents from rain.  The outer chest pockets are covered with a flap that is sealed with a small hook and loop patch.  The inside neck area has a fleece liner for comfort.  The sleeves can be cinched tight with hook and loop closures.

The Jasper is triple needle stitched and seam sealed.  All zippers on the coat have the YKK logo on them but are not waterproof.  However, a flap covers the main zipper and can be additionally secured with five snaps.  There are short pit-zips under each arm which have no flap but should be fairly waterproof due to the location.  The main zipper is really a dual zipper and has teeth on both sides.  The inside zipper is used to zip in a liner.  Once a liner is zipped in the other zipper is still available to zip the front of the coat together.  There are snaps located on the inside of each sleeve near the cuff and at the back at the neck that match small loops of cord (Dickies calls them locker loops) sewn onto each liner jacket.  This is especially helpful when removing the coat with a liner jacket attached as it keeps the sleeves aligned and also from separating.  For the record, I've already zipped in both liner jackets (separately of course) and the zipper system and locker loops work great.

Fit and Initial Impression
This is a big jacket, which makes sense because it is designed to work over a liner jacket, the Glacier Puffer in particular because the Glacier is a pretty thick liner jacket.  The Jasper appears to be very well constructed and gives the impression that it is a tough no-nonsense garment. I would say it is a little heavy compared to typical backpacking rain jackets, partly because it has a mesh liner but also because it lot bigger than any XL jacket I own.  This should be nice in summer when worn alone because the extra room will allow the jacket to billow as I move in it which helps ventilation.  In colder weather the addition of a liner jacket fills the space but the large shell still feels great because it isn’t overly snug when worn over a liner jacket.  I actually put on all three jackets briefly but was melting at 55 F (13 C).  I also felt like the Michelin Man but was able to bend or reach pretty much like normal.  

Dickies Pro Glacier Extreme
Size Tested XL
Listed Weight none given
Measured Weight 24 oz (681 g)
Material 100% nylon taffeta with 4 oz Thinsulate insulation
Color Gray (similar to Jasper Coat)
MSRP 59.99 - 65.99 USD (size dependent)

Dickies Pro Glacier Extreme
                                                                           Dickies Pro Glacier Extreme

Product Description
The Glacier Extreme Puffer features a DWR treatment to help the jacket repel water but is not a rain jacket.  The jacket features two zippered hand warmer pockets that are nicely lined with fleece on both sides.  There are also two inside zippered pocket on each side at chest level.  They are also lined with fleece and the left side one has a media port hole.  Each sleeve has an elastic cuff.  There is a small strip of fleece around the neck.  The zippers are all YKK.  There are three small loops of stretchy cord (locker loops) strategically located which help keep the jacket aligned with the Jasper Coat when zipped inside as a system.  Two are near the sleeve ends and one is in the center back at the neck line.  The jacket has a bungee cord with two barrel locks to snug the jacket at the waist.  The Thinsulate insulation in this jacket, thought not real bulky is pretty substantial in my opinion.  It also has the ability to insulate when wet more so than a traditional down jacket.  The downside is it isn't as compressible for packing as a down jacket.  

Fit and Initial Impression
I like that this jacket fits me almost perfectly.  The sleeve length is spot on and it is roomy at the shoulders but is not baggy.  The weight of the jacket is backpacker friendly for a jacket with this much synthetic insulation.   The material for the shell and liner is identical.  I wouldn’t say it is heavy duty but it isn’t paper thin like a few ultralight jackets I own.  The jacket also feels very warm.  I have worn it briefly a couple of times in temperatures as cool as 29 F (-2 C) and it was plenty warm.  With the Jasper over it I was downright toasty. One note, when zipped in as a liner I lose access to the inner pockets of the Jasper.  Since the Glacier has one fewer inner pocket, whenever I feel I will need more inner pockets I may not attach the jackets together.  Honestly, it seems to work just as well either way.   I did wear the Glacier Extreme in a light rain and the water beaded up and did not wet through the shell.  

Dickies Pro Glacier Extreme
                                             raindrops beading nicely

Dickies Pro Frost Extreme Fleece
Size Tested XL
Listed Weight none given
Measured Weight 27 oz (754 g)
Material 100% polyester polar fleece with DWR treatment
Color Gravel Gray
MSRP 59.99 USD

Dickies Pro Frost Extreme Fleece
                                                              Dickies Pro Frost Extreme Fleece

Product Description
The Frost is designed and constructed much like the Glacier jacket except it has more pockets. In addition to the hand warmer pockets it has a napoleon pocket on the outside upper left chest area.  It also has two very large inner pockets behind where the outside hand pockets are located, which are interesting in that if I place a hand in a hand warmer pocket the inner pocket is between where my hand is and the outer layer of the jacket.  There is a media port hole in the left side hand pocket.  The jacket has the same locker loops, elastic cuff at the wrist, and bungee cord/barrel locks at the waist as the Glacier jacket.  

Fit and Initial Impression
The Frost Fleece fits identical to the Glacier Puffer.  The sleeve length is just right and shoulders are roomy.  I was wearing a tee shirt under it but could easily wear a thicker shirt or even a tee shirt and a long sleeve flannel.   I’m tempted to say the Frost is going to be my favorite.  I say this because it is so comfortable.  I have been wearing it a lot already in cool breezy conditions and felt good at temperatures down to 40 F (4 C).  When I came inside I kept the jacket on awhile and it felt more like wearing a sweater or sweatshirt.  The wife is out of town a few days so I’ve been keeping the house cooler than normal.  I actually took a nap in it on the couch.  This concludes my Initial Report.

Field Report: January 18, 2019

Dickies Jasper
  headed to the Fiesta Bowl (and no, Bama is not playing)

Field Locations and Conditions
I have worn the jackets separately most of the time letting the current weather conditions dictate which jacket I needed.  I wore the Glacier jacket on an overnight hike when the low was 36 F (2 C) on December 3.  I carried and wore the Jasper on a trip to Phoenix, Arizona and wore it at 33 F (1 C) while there.  I also wore it a lot around home while it was cold, windy and raining, or just raining.  I wore the Frost Fleece the most and most of this as an everyday jacket.  This often included day hikes in the woods and or road walks with my wife.

Field Report Test Results
I’ll cover my uses in the order I described the jackets in my Initial Report.  Due to a very rainy last few months I was able to test the waterproof qualities of the Jasper thoroughly.  It passed with flying colors.  I was also quite surprised at how warm the Jasper allowed me to be.  Due to limited space it was the only jacket I carried on a recent flight to Phoenix, Arizona.  On January 1 I was able to attend the Fiesta Bowl (a football game at the same enclosed stadium the Arizona Cardinals play in). We parked a good 20-minute walk from the stadium and it was 33 F (1 C) when we parked.  It took about an hour to walk and get through security before we finally went inside.  Inside the stadium it was a little warmer but still around 50 F (10 C). I kept the Jasper on the whole game which lasted about three and a half hours.  The walk back to the car was quicker since we didn’t have to go through security but still took about 20 minutes.  It was 44 F (7 C) by now but I still wore the jacket, only unzipped this time. I had a polo shirt on under the jacket and was wearing blue jeans.  Back home in Alabama I wore the jacket in cold and windy rains several times.  Whether just walking over to my mom's or checking the mail, or several times when out for a 2 or 3 mile (3 to 5 km) hike.  When it was really cold I layered the Frost Fleece under the Jasper, but honestly, I didn’t need to do this except a few times when it was around 25 F (-4 C) and windy.  One thing I really liked was that the Jasper is big on me.  This allowed the jacket to fit over whatever layers I wanted without feeling tight.  An added benefit was I was able to just put the hood over my head and pull the jacket around my shoulders without putting my arms in the arm holes. This was handy when I would be going to my truck to go somewhere when it was raining.  I could then easily remove the jacket as I hopped in my truck but still stay reasonably dry.  In fact, if I leaned forward just a little as I walked the front of my chest stayed complete dry unless the wind was really driving the rain.  One last observation for the Jasper.  The pockets on the jacket are great for storing my phone, wallet and even a water bottle.  My phone often stayed in an inside pocket and was completely protected from the rain and cold as I walked.

Dickies Jasper
            Wearing the Jasper for quick sprint to my truck

Next up is the Glacier jacket.  I only wore it a few times, usually when it was in the low 20s F (around - 6 C) and I stayed warm.  It also cuts the wind very well.  I wore it some on an overnight hike on December 3 when the low was 36 F (2 C). I wore it a couple of hours that evening before turning in for the night when it was still about 40 F (4 C) and then wore it while hiking 2 miles (3 km) the next morning when it was 36 F (2 C).  I was using a 15 F (- C) quilt but if I got chilly under the quilt, wearing the jacket was my backup plan.  Fortunately I was able to use it as my pillow only during the night and it worked nicely for that.  The warmth was appreciated next morning as I broke camp and I did notice that my backpack felt a little snug when I had it on over the Glacier.  However, I was able to let the shoulder straps out a little and it was fine.  Due to the lack of a hood I also needed a boggin to keep my head and ears warm.

The Frost Fleece also proved to be very warm.  I would also say it was more comfortable over a wider range of temperatures than either the Jasper and especially the Glacier.  As a results this was my go-to jacket most of the time.  I wore it twice as much as the Jasper and probably 10 times more often then the Glacier.  It seems to breathe but was wind proof enough to keep me warm down to around freezing temperatures, yet still felt comfortable up to around 60 F (16 C).  I wore it day hiking, to church, to town, to work and just about anytime I need a jacket to go outside.   About the only times I didn’t wear it, it was raining or forecast to rain, or very cold and windy.  The only thing I would do to improve this jacket would be adding a hood.  I had to wear a boggin on several walks when a hood would have been appreciated and easily flipped back when not needed.  This is also the only jacket I have washed.  It wasn’t absolutely necessary but after wearing it on several day hikes in which I sweated in the jacket I figured a wash would be good.  It was no problem to wash in my washing machine and I dried it on my deck in a few hours.  Overall the durability of all three jackets seems very good.

This concludes my Field Report.  Please stay tuned for my Long Term Report in a couple of months.  I would like to thank Dickies and BackpackGearTest.org for this testing opportunity.



Read more reviews of Williamson-Dickie gear
Read more gear reviews by Coy Ray Starnes

Reviews > Clothing > Jackets > Dickies Pro Jasper Extreme Coat > Test Report by Coy Ray Starnes



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