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Reviews > Footwear > Boots > Chaco Tedinho Waterproof boots > Test Report by Gail Staisil

Chaco Tedinho Waterproof Boots
Test Series by: Gail Staisil, Marquette, Michigan


Page Contents:
 

Initial Report - October 29, 2012
Field Report - January 15, 2013
Long Term Report - March 21, 2013

Initial Report

October 29, 2012

Tester Information

Name: Gail Staisil
Age: 60
Gender: Female
Height: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
Weight: 152 lb (69 kg)
Boot Size: Women's 11 US/42 EU
Location: Marquette, Michigan USA
Email: woodswoman 2001 AT yahoo DOT com

For the last 20 years, backpacking has become a passion. I am a four-season backpacker and an off-trail navigator. Although I do take yearly trips to the American West or Southwest, the majority of my trips are in Michigan and Canada. My pack weight varies considerably but my base weight is below 18 lb (8 kg). I am primarily a tarp camper who averages more than 50 nights a year backpacking in a huge variety of weather conditions including relentless rain, wet snow and sub-zero temps.
 

Product Information

Manufacturer
Chaco
Website http://www.chacos.com/US/en
Model Tedinho Waterproof
Color 
Black (also available in Bungee and Tarvia, both are shades of brown)
Size
Women's 11 (42 EU), also available in a full range of sizes including men's sizes 
Manufacturer  Weight  NA
Tested Weight  2 lb 8.2 oz (1.15 kg) per pair, each boot weighed exactly the same at 1 lb 4.1 oz (0.57 kg)
Model Year 2012
MSRP $150.00 US, Made in China

Initial Impressions and Product Description


The Chaco Tedinho Waterproof Boots arrived in the requested size and color.  No hangtags or other information was included.


Fit

I ordered the Tedinhos in a women's size 11 US (42 EU) rather than my former normal size of 10.5 US (41.5 EU).  I wasn't sure of the sizing but lately I have been going up a half size in trail shoes or boots as my feet seem to require extra length in the toe area. They fit perfectly! The first thing I noticed is how comfortable they seemed. Oftentimes leather boots can be very stiff at first. The full grain leather feels very soft and flexible. I received the boots in the color of black. They are trimmed with the colors of gray and a bit of red.


Design and Technical Features

The Tedinhos are waterproof boots with combination type-lacing that consists of loops, eyelets and hooks. The manufacturer refers to it as "square military-style lacing". The bottom of each lace goes through a center loop and then threads through three loops on each side followed by two sets of eyelets and then one set of hooks. One of the bottom loops on each boot is red while the rest are gray. I would assume that the red loop signifies the outside of the right and left boot respectively but if it doesn't; it adds interest to the boots anyway. 
As aforementioned the Tedinhos that I am testing are reportedly waterproof. Other than a small metal tag that says "waterproof" on the exterior side of each boot there was no information that I could find as to what kind of waterproof membrane is present. (The Tedinhos are also available Soles of Tedinhosin a non-waterproof version.) 

 Cushioned insoles
The uppers of the Tedinho Boots are a full-grain leather. The exterior collar area of each boot features an insert of a soft suede-like material. The tongue of each boot is also fabricated with the suede material and has a strip of a patterned webbing sewn down the middle of each tongue. The upper end of the webbing is sewn into a convenient pull loop. Another pull loop is located on the top back of each heel.

The toe area of each boot features seamless smooth and shaped leather.  Seams aren't visible until the beginning of the mid-foot area. Those seams are double stitched. The rand slightly raises in the front of each toe area and it contours around the heel area of each boot.

The Tedinhos are comfortably lined in a micro fleece-type material with a strip of nylon-mesh material circling the inside of the collar and back of the tongue.
 
What I find very intriguing is the insoles that are provided by the manufacturer. The insoles aren't ordinary ones as they are very cushioned with a very deep lug pattern on the bottom of them (especially in the arch area). The LUVSEAT X03 platform reportedly adds the extra arch support. The insoles are more flexible and cushioned than many I have used before. The tops of the insoles are covered with a soft material that is embossed or textured.

The Eco-Tread Soles have been designed for high traction with a lug depth of 3.5 mm (0.14 in). The soles are made with 25 percent recycled rubber.

Chaco products are warranted to be free of defects in materials or workmanship for the life of the product according to the manufacturer.

I have already worn the Tedinhos on a short hike of 4 miles (6.5 km) with no issues. I look forward to lots more time on the trail wearing the Tedinhos. It is the season of rain, sleet and snow here so the waterproof boots will be exposed to many wet conditions.
 

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Field Report

January 15, 2013

USA Locations and Conditions

During the field test period I have worn the Chaco Tedinho Boots almost daily for hiking and everyday wear. They were also worn during two backcountry trips totaling five days. Approximate mileage for all wear is 170 mi (274 km). Location of the backcountry trips were in Michigan and ranged from hilly deciduous forest to open non-deciduous communities. Elevation ranged from 600 ft (183 m) to almost 2000 ft (610 m).


Location of Backpacking Trip to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore: Upper Peninsula of Michigan      Hiawatha National Forest
Type of Trip: Trail
Distance: 12 mi (19.32 km)
Length of Trip: 2 days/1 night
Pack Weight: 25.5 lb (11.6 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy and very windy
Precipitation: None
Temperature Range: 33 F to 46 F (1 C to 8 C)
 

Location of Sledge Trip: Hiawatha National Forest, Michigan
Type of Trip: Trail
Distance: 18 mi (29 km)
Length of Trip: 3 days/2 nights
Sled Weight: Approx 40 lb (18 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy, snowstorms   
Precipitation: Approx 6 in (15 cm) of new snow
Temperature Range: 10 F to 24 F (-12 C to -4 C)

 
Location of Dayhikes and Snowshoeing: Upper Peninsula of Michigan 
Distances: 4 mi to 6 mi (6.5 to 9.6 km)
Temperature Range: 15 F to 38 F (-9 C to 3 C)
 

Performance in the Field
 
Unequivocally the Chaco Tedinho Boot have been the most comfortable leather boots I have ever worn. There was virtually no break in time and I haven't had one iota of discomfort while wearing them. As norm, I started by wearing them for short dayhikes but found that adding distance didn't hamper the comfort. I soon went out on a 12 mi (19.32 km) backpacking trip with the first day hiking over 8 miles (12.88 km).

What I still can't believe is that I am using the insoles that came with the boots with no desire to change them out. Normally I have to change out insoles quickly in other boots due to less comfort than I desire. The LUVSEAT XO3 platform are not only comfortable but the textured surface of them is non slippery. I have worn many types of socks with the boots included ones made from CoolMax and others made of wool. The nicely padded insoles completely give my feet enough arch support and even after countless miles I have never felt uncomfortable in them.

The Chaco Tedinho lace system is easy to use and I place and remove my feet from the boots rather quickly when the laces are untied. The laces have remained secure upon tying. I usually double knot them for backpacking and snowshoeing but not so much for regular wear.
Snowshoeing in the Tedinhos
The ECO-Tread traction has performed great on the soles of the boots. I have experienced everything from sand, rocks, and roots to water, ice and all conditions of snow. I have not experienced any slipping due to traction other than on slush (normal with most footwear).

It is winter here now so I have been also wearing the boots with my snowshoes for hikes. The boots have adapted to the snowshoe bindings readily and they have been proven to be a good lightweight waterproof boot for that purpose. Often times winter boots are too heavy for quick-paced snowshoeing and I have in the past on day trips just worn running shoes with snowshoes. The Chaco Tedinhos give my ankles more protection (when one of the snowshoes accidentally hits my ankle), are warmer and waterproof. It is also worth mentioning that my feet have never been cold in these boots although I have experienced temperatures down to 10 F (-12 C).


Durability So Far
Dayhiking on icy surfaces
Foremost I have been highly impressed with the waterproof nature. I have not treated the leather of the boots with anything yet. The leather feels supple and there have been no leaks in the waterproof boots although they have been exposed to rain, wet vegetation and every form of snow including one hike in deep slush. All other components of the boots are still in top condition.

As a side note, I have received tons of compliments on the appearance of these boots from friends and strangers. I think the ribbon trim on the tongue sets them aside from ordinary boots as they look rather stylish and kind of Swiss. When I describe the merits of the boots many have been interested in obtaining a pair. Look out Chaco!


Summary
 
So far, I am highly impressed with the performance of the Chaco Tedinho Boots. Not only are they comfortable and waterproof but they also have great traction and style.


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Long Term Report
March 21, 2013


USA Locations and Conditions

During the long term test period I have continued to wear the Chaco Tedinho Boots almost daily. They were also worn during four backcountry trips totaling ten days. Additional mileage during this period is at least 130 mi (330 cm). Location of the backcountry trips were in Michigan and ranged from hilly deciduous forest to open non-deciduous communities. Elevation ranged from 600 ft (183 m) to almost 2000 ft (610 m).

Location (Feb 4- 5): Hiawatha National Forest, Michigan
Type of Trip: Trail/rustic cabin trip
Distance: 7 mi (11.3 km) Camp at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
Length of Trip: 2 days/1 night
Sled Weight: Approx 40 lb (18 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Snow    
Precipitation: 0.22 in (56 cm) 
Temperature Range: 13 F to - 4 F (-11 C to -20 C) 
 
Location (Feb 9-11): Hiawatha National Forest, Michigan
Type of Trip: Trail/rustic cabin trip
Distance: 11 mi (17.7 km)
Length of Trip: 3 days/2 nights
Sled Weight: Approx 45 lb (20.4 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy, snow   
Precipitation: 0.70 in (1.78 cm) Snow
Temperature Range: 34 F to -3 F (1 C to -19 C)

Location (March 2- 4): Hiawatha National Forest Western Unit, Michigan
Type of Trip: Trail
Distance: 20.5 mi (33 km)  Walking amongst ice boulders on Lake Superior, Michigan
Length of Trip: 3 days/2 nights
Sled Weight: Approx 40 lb (18 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy, snowstorms   
Precipitation: 0.01 in (0.03 cm) Snow
Temperature Range: 24 F to 7 F (-4 C to -14 C)

Location (March 18-19): Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Michigan
Type of Trip: Trail/Bushwhack
Distance: 10.5 mi (16.9 km) 
Length of Trip: 2 days/1 night
Sled Weight: Approx 40 lb (18 kg)
Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy, snowstorms   
Precipitation: 0.58 in (1.47 cm) which is more than 11 in (28 cm) of new snow
Temperature Range: 34 F to 9 F (1 C to -13 C )

 
Location of Dayhikes, Sledding and Snowshoeing: Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Wisconsin 
Distances: 4 mi to 6 mi (6.5 km to 9.6 km)
Temperature Range: 15 F to 38 F (-9 C to 3 C)
 

Performance in the Field
  Sledding in Wisconsin
The Chaco Tedinho Boots have continued to be absolutely amazing boots. I usually don't get overexcited about utilitarian footwear but they have been an exception! have worn them almost everyday for all activities including just walking about, snow shoveling (I have hand shoveled over 14 ft (4.27 m) of snow from every speck of my driveway and deck during the test period--obviously the snow has been continuous and didn't fall all at one time), sledding, snowshoeing (while pulling a sledge on the backcountry trips as well as day outing snowshoeing) and more.

I have never had the slightest discomfort while wearing the boots and needless to say without re-iterating everything I like about them from the field test period, my opinion has remained unchanged! Traction, insoles, the lace system, their appearance and waterproofness are still top notch.

Due to the snow depth during my last trip (at least 4 ft/1.22 m) I wore the Tedinhos while pulling my sledge but changed over to high-top mukluks at camp. I've never been fond of wearing tall gaiters with boots (due to lack of airflow) although I wear shorter ones while snowshoeing as I already have some floatation.

As far as durability the boots have held up extremely well. There are no areas that the leather is damaged (unless small scratches are counted) or where the seams are not perfect. The insoles that the manufacturer provided are amazingly still comfortable.

SnowshoeingI actually went out and bought some Sno-Seal to protect the waterproof finish but I never got around to applying it as it simply wasn't needed. I am amazed at the waterproofness as this is often the first thing to fail in similar footwear. The leather is still very soft even though it has been exposed to rough ice, road salt and every form of snow that exists. The boots have never had to be cleaned as they are constantly "cleaned" by the almost daily snowfall.

The boots have kept my feet dry and warm in all kinds of temperatures even those below zero (-18 C).
I have mostly worn light-to-medium weight wool knee socks for almost all outings.

I have worn the boots while snowshoeing extensively and have had no problem fitting the boots into the bindings (of two different types of snowshoes). I have also worn the Tedinhos with Kahtoola MicroSpikes on several hikes where icy conditions were encountered throughout including exploring ice caves and lakeshore ice travel. The crampons slipped easily over the boots and comfort was never a concern.


Summary
 
Undeniably these boots are a superior product and have performed flawlessly over 280 mi (711 km) during almost five months of testing. I will continue to wear them for many outings and it wouldn't surprise me if I purchase a back-up pair.


  Pros
 

  •     Waterproof
  •     Full-grain leather uppers
  •     Easy lacing
  •     Comfortable
  •     Very supportive insoles


Cons

  •      None

Tester Remarks

Thanks to Chaco and BackpackGearTest.org for this opportunity to test the Tedinho Boots. This concludes my Long Term Report and the test series.

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