BackpackGearTest
  Home Guest - Not logged in 

Reviews > Packs > Internal and External Framed Backpacks > Dakine Outtabounds Pack > Test Report by Mike Wilkie

DAKINE OUTTABOUNDS PACK
TEST SERIES BY MIKE WILKIE
LONG-TERM REPORT
April 28, 2009

CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO THE FIELD REPORT
CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO THE LONG-TERM REPORT

TESTER INFORMATION

NAME: Mike Wilkie
EMAIL: foreverwild1885 at yahoo dot com
AGE: 32
LOCATION: Davenport, New York (USA)
GENDER: M
HEIGHT: 5' 8" (1.73 m)
WEIGHT: 148 lb (67.10 kg)

Hiking for me started at an early age, as I was always an avid camper and as a young Scout my backpacking obsession began. Living in the Catskill Region backpacking has become serious for me over the years. I hike, snowshoe, canoe, snowboard or multi-day backpack through the Catskills or Adirondacks almost every weekend. I am learning and practicing safe lightweight techniques and have greatly reduced my pack weight, adding comfort and miles to my adventures. Being an aspirant of the Catskill-3500 Club and Adirondack-46ers, peak-bagging is my main outdoor activity. My long-term goals are to complete long distance thru-hikes.


INITIAL REPORT

PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

November 18, 2008

Manufacturer: Dakine
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Manufacturer's Website: http://www.dakine.com
MSRP: US$160.00

Manufacturer Details
Listed Weight (main pack): 4 lbs (1.8 kg)
Listed Weight (shuttle pack): 1.5 lbs (.7 kg)
Volume (main pack): 2300 cu in (38 L)
Volume (shuttle pack): 728 cu in (12 L)
Size (main pack): 26 x 1 x 8 in (66 x 28 x 20 cm)
Size (shuttle pack): 20.5 x 12 x 4 in (52 x 31 x 10 cm)
Materials: 630D Nylon

Tester Details
Weight (main pack): 3 lb 9 oz (1.62 kg)
Weight (shuttle pack): 1 lb 12.5 oz (0.81 kg)
Weight (main and shuttle): 5 lb 7 oz (2.47 kg)


IMAGE 1
Image courtesy of dakine.com


INITIAL IMPRESSIONS

The Dakine Outtabounds Pack is listed as a snow sports pack that offers features that will accommodate various snow gear. Gear such as ice axe, snowboard and skis can easily be attached to the outside of the pack. The pack also offers an outer snow tool and shovel pocket that can be easily accessible to retrieve avalanche gear.

The Outtabounds is a two piece pack offering more functionality and versatility. This innovative design allows a smaller 728 cu in (12 L) pack (shuttle pack) to be removed from the 2300 cu in (38 L) main pack. Before I received the pack my initial thoughts were that the pack would break down into two backpacks. Although it does break down into two packs, the main piece can not be used as a backpack on its own. This is due to the fact that the shuttle pack makes up the shoulder straps and waist belt for both as shown pictured below. However, the main pack contains a small handle tucked away in a small zippered pocket on its side. The neat feature allows me to use the main pack without the shuttle, sort of like a luggage bag. At this point the shuttle pack can now be used as a carry-on.

IMAGE 2
Image courtesy of dakine.com



With the main pack used with the shuttle pack there are many features and space to accommodate winter gear and extra layers for long day trips, treks to a secluded hut or for a quick overnighter. During these upcoming months I will assert how the pack carries and organizes my various gear with its inner pack space and outer attachment points.

The main pack has two lid pockets (one fleece lined), an external pocket for stashing avalanche gear, two external water bottle sleeves and a top loading main compartment with back panel access. Features of the shuttle pack are a fleece lined waist belt pocket, a main compartment with a mesh hydration sleeve to accommodate a reservoir, a left shoulder hose port that runs through the shoulder strap to a zippered access area to retrieve the bite valve and hose, and a front pocket to stash a snow shovel or other various gear. Attaching the shuttle pack to the main creates a full featured snow sport backpack.

Both the main and shuttle packs contain ladder locking straps to vertically attach a snowboard and skis with use of the provided loops. Also on both packs these straps tuck away into their small hidden sleeves eliminating the annoyance and clutter of the unused dangling straps. I did have a hard time trying to find the hidden straps on the main pack as the sleeves are well hidden. I actually didn't find these straps until four days after receiving the backpack. I initially thought they weren't offered on the main and this was disappointing at the time.

When I initially received the pack I was caught off guard by the pack's weight and size. The main pack offers much more space than expected but I also expected to use the main as a backpack without the shuttle. Because the shuttle must be inside to use the main pack as a backpack this increases the weight more than expected as well.

On the main pack the load lifter straps ladder lock onto the shoulder straps of the shuttle pack to form the harness system. Thus far during my initial try out of the pack the load lifter straps help to transfer loads and distribute the pack weight. The main pack also features compression straps to help stabilize loads. On the back panel on the main pack is raised mesh padding with a little more thickness on lumbar section. During this test series I will be evaluating how well this back panel helps to move trapped moisture off the back as well as the level of comfort given. The shuttle pack only contains the raised mesh padding in the small lumbar section of the waist belt. The rest of the back panel has a thin flexible padding throughout. The inner waist belt and shoulder straps feel like a neoprene material.

READING THE INSTRUCTIONS

Unfortunately there were no real instructions given with the Outtabounds Pack. There was a features card attached to the pack with only five pictures that show different views and features of the pack. In four of the five pictures there is another pack shown to represent the Outtabounds Pack where only a few of the features are the same. This left me to find the features on my own and guess what they were for and how they work. This is probably why it took me so long to find the hidden board straps on the main piece.

TRYING IT OUT

Initially I tested how easy it was for me to organize gear on both the interior and exterior of the pack. My snowboard attaches to both packs easily and comfortably. An important factor for me will be attaching my snowshoes to the packs when not carrying a snowboard. This was easily accomplished. Personally I feel the snowshoes fit on the pack better then my board. Like the snowboard the snowshoes have to be attached vertically. Both packs contain rubber padding on the front for protection from a snowboard or skis.

For me the nicest feature was on the shuttle pack. This would be the quick draw ice axe sleeve. The sleeves allow the ice axe to be easily and quickly retrieved without taking off the pack. By reaching behind with my right hand and releasing the ladder lock the axe quickly slipped down into the palm of my hand. The ice axe can also attach to the main pack with the standard loop and a hook and loop strap for the handle. This can be done on either side of the main pack.

Instead of carrying avalanche gear the snow tool pockets make a perfect place for storing my crampons, tarp-tent gear, snow shovel when needed or other various items that need to be at easy access. The snow tool pocket on the main pack has a small vent to help reduce any collection of water or moisture. One of the lid pockets on the main pack is fleece lined. This is perfect for stashing and protecting my snow goggles or sunglasses.

I was able to pack up the Outtabounds with all of my overnight gear and warm layers and was still left with enough space for food and water. The pack should allow me to take quick overnight trips or at least day hike to a lean-to for shelter.

SUMMARY

Aside from the extra weight of the Outtabounds pack I feel it will offer me the space needed to carry the gear for my winter treks and snowboard trips. It offers plenty of features to accommodate winter gear plus some extra space for warm layers and overnight equipment.

The shuttle pack makes for a great summit pack if base camping or has just enough space for the short treks. It's small enough to use for the essentials while snowboarding and easy to don while on the board.

Personally I feel the Outtabounds Pack offers enough features to use as a travel pack, including quick and easy access to the necessities. The main pack converts into a nice luggage pack and the shuttle makes a nice carry-on whether traveling by plane, bus, train or taxi.

Pros
Outer attachment points for carrying snow sports gear
Large amount of space offered in the main pack
Attachment of snowshoes
Quick draw ice axe sleeve on shuttle pack
Fleece lined waist belt and lid pockets

Cons
Heavy weight of the pack
The shuttle pack within the main pack takes up much space


FIELD REPORT

FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

The Dakine Outtabounds Pack was used and tested in the following locations and conditions.

Bald Mountain - West-Central Adirondack Region
Route: Bald ((Rondaxe) Mountain Trail
Weather: 35 F (1.67 C) at trailhead, 32 F (0 C) on summit with wind chills - Mostly cloudy
Distance: 2 miles (3.22 km) out and back
Ascent (elevation change): 390 ft (119 m)
Summit elevation: 2350 ft (716 m)
Difficulty: Moderate with icy conditions, snowmelt and packed trail snow. Snowshoes were mostly use but crampons were worn on icy steps during ascent and for most of the way down. Packed trail snow was at lower elevations and increasing ice at higher elevations and exposed areas. On this trip I used both components of the Outtabounds Pack for the extra space provided.

Moss Lake (Day 1) - West-Central Adirondack Region
Route: Via the Circuit Trail
Weather: Cold and icy with temperatures around 22 F (-5.55 C) Mostly cloudy
Distance: 2.5 miles (4.03 km)
Difficulty: Moderately easy - mostly level trek with some hilly terrain. Snowshoes were worn for this hike. Icy conditions made for some difficult traction is some areas. On this trip I used both components of the Outtabounds Pack, but quickly realized that the extra space provided by using both components was not needed.

Moss Lake (Day 2) - West-Central Adirondack Region
Route: Via the Circuit Trail
Weather: Cold and snowy with temperatures around 22 F (-5.55 C) - total fresh snow accumulation: five in (12.70 cm)
Distance: 2.5 miles (4.03 km)
Difficulty: Moderately easy - mostly level trek with some hilly terrain. Snowshoes were worn for this hike. On this trip I opted to use the shuttle pack alone as the extra space and weight of using both components was not needed.

Robert V. Riddell State Park (Day hike 1): Susquehanna River Valley - Oneonta, NY (In the foothills of the Catskill Mountains)
Route: Parks main loop trail
Weather: 15 F (-9.43 C) with wind chills below 0 F (18 C) light snow
Distance: 4 mile (6.5 km) loop
Difficulty: easy with mostly level terrain. This trail is a great snowshoe/ski trail. Snowshoes were worn for this trek. Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.

Robert V. Riddell State Park (Day hike 2): Susquehanna River Valley - Oneonta, NY (In the foothills of the Catskill Mountains)
Route: Parks main loop trail
Weather: 20 F (-6.6 C) heavy snow at times with fresh snow accumulations of 12 in (30.48 cm)
Distance: 4 mile (6.5 km) loop
Difficulty: easy with mostly level terrain. This trail is a great snowshoe/ski trail. Snowshoes were worn for this trek. Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.


Robert V. Riddell State Park (Day hike 3): Susquehanna River Valley - Oneonta, NY (In the foothills of the Catskill Mountains)
Route: Parks main loop trail
Weather: 15 F (-9.43 C) with wind chills below 0 F (18 C) light snow
Distance: 4 mile (6.5 km) loop
Difficulty: easy with mostly level terrain. This trail is a great snowshoe/ski trail. Snowshoes were worn for this trek. Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.

Robert V. Riddell State Park (Day hike 4): Susquehanna River Valley - Oneonta, NY (In the foothills of the Catskill Mountains)
Route: Parks main loop trail
Weather: 34 F (1 C) sleet, rain and ice mix
Distance: 4 mile (6.5 km) loop
Difficulty: easy with mostly level terrain. This trail is a great snowshoe/ski trail. Snowshoes were worn for this trek. Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.

I used the shuttle pack for several snowshoe hikes in the forest behind my home. This is a 2 mile (3.22 km) bushwhack, mostly on an uphill/downhill, rocky terrain and is a moderate ascend to an elevation of 2000 ft (610 m). I have logged this trek for five separate days. Snowshoes were worn for all of these hikes.

The Outtabounds Pack was used on a six night/seven day trip to a cabin in the Adirondack Mountains. The packs usage was for a travel bag and pack. I used the shuttle pack separate for essentials and the large component was used as a travel bag.

For this leg of the test series, I have logged 18 days when the Outtabounds pack has been used and tested. Total trail mileage is 33 miles (53 km). Both components were used together as a whole for a total of 2 days and 4.5 trail miles (7.25 km). The shuttle pack was used alone for 17 days of use and 28.5 trail miles (46 km). The main pack was use alone for seven days as a travel bag. Since the main pack needs the shuttle pack to be converted into a backpack it was not used alone when out on the trail.

PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

The Dakine Outtabounds Pack has been used and tested in various locations and conditions. Thus far, the pack's many features allowed me to stow my winter gear and trekking necessities with ease. However, I do have only a few issues with the pack.

The first big issue I have is with the pack's heavy weight. As I have been working on reducing my base pack weight in recent years, the Outtabounds has set me back a few pounds. This increase in weight has forced me to use the shuttle pack alone as much as possible. However, the small size of the shuttle pack can only accommodate enough winter gear for my shorter day hikes or non-technical hikes. I have found that I need to utilize both components of the Outtabounds to accommodate all necessary gear for hikes that are more technical or mountain climbing trip where I have deal with the pack's heavy weight. In spite of the heavy weight, when both component are used together the pack offers a great harness system. The load-lifter straps help to stabilize and transfer the pack weight increasing performance and comfort in the field.

My other complaint is about the shuttle pack. When carrying a full reservoir (1.5 - 2 L) of water little space is left to stow my winter gear. My crampons and some other small items such as flashlight, wallet and some emergency items completely fill the zippered outer pocket. A few garment items and snack can be stuffed it the pocket with the reservoir. My camera occupies the zippered fleece lined waist belt pocket. That is basically all that can fit. If the pack were a bit larger, it would make for an excellent winter daypack. For this, I would need space to fit some extra warm layers, lunch and a few other necessities. I did however find that the shuttle pack would make for an excellent warm weather daypack when winter gear is no longer needed.

As a travel bag, the main pack worked out well when using the added side handle. The handle allowed the main pack to be carried like a duffle. This made it easy to tote around and pack into and from the car. With the shuttle pack removed the main pack offers much space to pack my winter gear, clothing, insulated layers and boots. Some of my wife's gear somehow made its way into the pack as well. The shuttle pack at this time was used as just that, carrying my necessities for easy access.

My snowshoes always had an easy attachment to both the main and shuttle pack. In addition, both my ski poles and ice axe were easily fastened to the pack attachment points. The main pack offers a drain vent on the outer snow tool pocket for any wetness that may make its way in.

I have found the Outtabounds Pack to be durable, as it has no signs of wear at this time. The pack still appears new in condition with no thread pulls or abrasion marks. All straps, ladder locks and zippers run smoothly without snagging or failure.

As for weather resistance, the Dakine pack has consistently shed snow, ice and any wetness from freezing rain. I will however better evaluate the water resistance as the temperatures rise, snow melts and rain begins to fall.

SUMMARY

The Dakine Outtabounds Pack has proven to be a durable and reliable pack with many features that increase its versatility. The pack has easily accommodated my winter gear and offered easy attachment for my snowshoes, ski poles and/or ice axe.

As a travel bag, the main pack provided much space for insulated clothing and boots along with my various winter hiking gear. However, the weight of the pack makes me hesitate on using it on certain trips. The shuttle pack has limited space when use alone for a winter daypack. However, it does accommodate my base gear comfortably and that should make for an excellent warm weather daypack. The harness system when using both components as a whole has helped to increase comfort and performance in the field.

Pros
Variety of attachment points to hold numerous pieces of winter gear
Drain vent on the snow tool pocket to avoid water build up
Fleece lined lid and waist belt pocket to cushion sensitive gear

Cons
Heavy weight
Small size of shuttle pack

This concludes my Field Report on the Dakine Outtabounds Pack. The Long Term Report will be appended here in approximately two months.


LONG-TERM REPORT

LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

The Dakine Outtabounds Pack was used and tested in the following locations and conditions.

South Hill State Forest - 3 mile (4.83 km) Bushwhack
Weather: Windy with some sun, temperature was 33 F (0.56 C)
Elevation: 2000 F (610 m)
Difficulty: Easy to Moderate on mostly level terrain. Some dense brush increased difficulty to moderate.
Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.

South Hill State Forest - 3.5 mile (5.64 km) Loop hike on old logging road.
Weather: 38 F (3.33 C) with light rain
Elevation: 2000 F (610 m)
Difficulty: Easy on an old logging road
Only the shuttle pack was used on this trip.

The Dakine pack was used and tested on several snowshoe hikes in the forest behind my home. This is a 2 mile (3.22 km) bushwhack, mostly on an uphill/downhill, rocky terrain and is a moderate ascent to an elevation of 2000 ft (610 m). I have logged 2 days for this trek. Snowshoes were worn for all of these hikes. Only the shuttle pack was used on these treks.

I used the Outtabounds Pack on a three day travel trip to Hampton, VA. Travel was by hopping buses from central New York State, through Pennsylvania, Maryland and the District of Columbia. Overnight camping was at the Newport News Campground. Weather conditions when leaving New York State were freezing temperatures with light snow. When arriving in Virginia weather was 70 F (21 C), sunny and clear on day one and on day two temperatures were near 80 F (27 C) and sunny. Average elevation in Hampton, Virginia was 25 ft (7.5 m). The Outtabounds Pack was use as a travel pack and the Shuttle was detached for local use when not traveling.

Another trip where the Outtabounds Pack was used as a travel pack was on an 8 day trip to Northern Costa Rica. The shuttle pack received much use as well for site seeing, day hikes and during travel as a "shuttle pack". The average temperatures for the week were around 80 F (27 C) but on a few occasions, the temperature rose up to 90 F (32 C). Weather conditions were humid with light rain at night and much sun during the day. It rained hard for about five hours on one day. Day hikes took place in or near the Tenorio Volcano National Park. The highest elevation reached was 3200 ft (1916 m). The camp location was located just outside the national park where we stayed in a rustic cabin seated on the Rio Celeste.

Carolina Trail (Day hike 1) - Just outside Tenorio Volcano National Park - Costa Rica
Distance: 2 mile (3.22 km) loop
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
Terrain: Maintained trail through dense rain forest, a short distance along the Rio Celeste River and through open farmland while avoiding intimidating bulls, a poison frog and a Bushmaster snake.
Weather: Sunny and humid with some clouds, 80 F (27 C)
Average Elevation: 1575 ft (480 m)

Carolina Trail (Day hike 2) - Just outside Tenorio Volcano National Park - Costa Rica
Distance: 2 mile (3.22 km) loop
Difficulty: Easy to moderate
Terrain: Maintained trail through dense rain forest, a short distance along the Rio Celeste River and through open farmland while avoiding intimidating bulls only this time around.
Weather: Sunny and humid with some clouds, 85 F (29 C)
Average Elevation: 1575 ft (480 m)

Rio Celeste Trail - Tenorio Volcano National Park
Distance: 5 miles (8 km)
Difficulty: Strenuous with some steep climbs and river crossings
Terrain: somewhat maintained trail through dense jungle, steep mountain traverse and fast moving river crossings.
Weather 79 F (26 C) Mostly sunny and humid
Highlights: Rio Celeste River, hot springs, swimming under a waterfall, Volcan Tenorio and Tapir poop

The shuttle pack of the Outtabounds pack system was use almost daily during my trip to Costa Rice while traveling via horseback. This was a 2-hour ride just before dusk through dense rainforest and open farmland. I logged this horseback ride six times during my Costa Rican trip. These rides were the highlight of my trip where the views could not be beaten.

Also on several other excursions, the shuttle pack was used as a daypack. I hiked the busy streets of Upala, a city located just south of the Nicaragua border and along the dirt roads of the small farming town Bijagua. The pack was also used on a 2 hour boat ride down the Cano Negro River. The river is located in the higher elevations of the northern zone. Weather was always sunny, hot and humid for these excursions.

I logged a total of 15 days where the Dakine Outtabounds Pack was used and tested during this final leg of the test series. During this final testing leg, the Outtabounds was mostly used as a front-country travel pack and the shuttle pack was deployed for use as a daypack. These day trips consisted of excursions through Costa Rican towns and cities, rainforest day hikes, volcano traverses, horseback rides through jungle and farmland and on front country daytrips here in the US. In the beginning of this testing period, the pack was used on four backcountry snowshoe treks.

PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

Even though the heavyweight of the pack remains a concern, I have learned to appreciate the features, function and performance of the Outtabounds more and more with all my consistent use. The pack offered versatility with its features and quality with its durability. However, I feel a few of the features can be improved upon.

As a front-country travel pack, I learned that having the optional detachable shuttle pack proved to be quite useful. The Outtabounds stowed all my hiking gear including my trail shoes, water shoes and a few days worth of warm weather apparel. I learned the loaded pack was perfectly sized for use as a carry-on for airplanes and buses. I would then detach the smaller shuttle pack to have with me at all times while the main pack was stowed in the overhead compartment. As a carry-on, the Outtabounds helped me to save much unnecessary time and money, as to checking it in with the airlines. As soon as I exited either vehicle, I reattached the shuttle pack to use the Outtabounds as one backpack that proved much easier to carry.

The pack's load was easy to secure and stabilize with the compression straps and load-lifter straps. All load weights were an easy and comfortable carry, although ml load never exceeded 30 lbs (16 kg). The load-lifters allowed me to transfer weight and the back-panel padding cushioned the load. The lumbar padding helped to reduce any strain or pressure on the lower back. My waist was always comfortable with the waist belt with no pinching or rubbing.

Mentioned in my previous report, the fleece-lined lid pocket provided protection for my snow goggles. I found on my travels that this pocket also offered protection for my electronics such as GPS, IPOD, cell phone and on occasion my sunglasses or diving mask. The water-resistant fleece-lined waist-belt pocket doubled as a wallet when traveling and protection for my camera when hiking.

I really liked having the optional luggage handle on the main pack when the shuttle pack was detached. Using this handle allowed me to carry the pack like a duffle bag for easier transport. And when the handle was no longer needed, it tucked away back inside its zippered pocket.

As I have stated since the beginning, the Outtabounds Pack has proven to be a bit too heavy for long backcountry foot travel. However, the shuttle pack made for an excellent daypack during this leg as winter gear was reduced or removed from my current gear list. Having the optional shuttle pack when traveling overseas or long distance proved to be the most valuable feature of the Outtabounds' for me.

For my time spent in Costa Rica, the Outtabounds Pack provided me with both luggage bag and daypack. The Dakine Outtabounds Pack was really designed for winter use and gear. However, the pack and its features proved to be most useful and compatible to warm weather use and gear. I liked having the drain/air vent on the snow-tool pockets to carry my wet water-shoes or gear allowing drainage and breathability for any trapped wetness.

A comfortable fit, stable load and stable pack position always provided. Loads no matter what size always remained stable on my back and to my knowledge gear never shifted internally.

Stated earlier, there are a few features of the pack that I feel can be improved. The mesh draw-cord sleeve in the main compartment could be higher to help hold gear in place and from falling out when accessing the shuttle pack. I feel that if the sleeve covered half of the back-panel opening instead of a third, gear would be more secure and still be accessible.

Another feature that can improve the function of the pack would be to incorporate a front access to the main compartment. With the current design, to retrieve a gear item stowed in or near the bottom of the back, I have to gain access by undoing the load-lifter straps and opening the entire pack like a book. Gear can now shift around or fall out. This is where the longer mesh sleeve would be useful. The other option would be to dig around from the top access displacing all my neatly packed gear. With a small access point in the lower front to the main compartment, less gear would be disturbed and time would be saved. Besides, sometimes space can be limited like in a tent or an airplane seat were opening the entire pack is not permitted.

The last thing that can be improved to help increase the packs performance and function is to reduce material weight. I believe that if lightweight materials were incorporated into the construction and features of the Outtabounds Pack, much weight can be reduced. However, most likely due to the heavy construction, I have no complaints about the pack's durability. Through all the use and abuse that the Dakine pack received, there are little signs of wear. The heavy-duty nylon resisted abrasion and punctures showing only a few scuff marks. All stitching remains tight with no thread pulls, and all zippers, ladder-locks and draw-cords operate and run as smoothly as they did when new.

SUMMARY

Throughout this test series, my view of the Dakine Outtabounds Pack grew more and more positive with my continued use. The pack offers many features and functions to accommodate winter gear and use, but it also proved to be worthy for warm weather use. For me the Outtabounds pack offered versatility, proved to be durable, and made of high quality. I will continue to use the Outtabounds Pack for my long distance travels aboard and locally. The shuttle pack will remain as just that, a "shuttle pack". In addition, because of the features offered I will continue to use the Dakine Outtabounds Pack as a winter day hike or snowshoe trekking pack. But unfortunately, the Outtabounds will not be used on my longer mile (km) backpacks in the backcountry due to its heavy weight.

Pros
Detachable shuttle pack
Snow-tool pockets with drain/air vents
Water-resistant fleece-lined waist belt packet and fleece lid pocket
Snowboard straps and ice axe sleeve
Durability
Load-lifters and many other features

Cons
Heavy weight
Lack of front access to main compartment
Internal mesh sleeve with draw-cord is too short


This report was created with the BackpackGearTest.org Report Writer Version 1. Copyright 2009. All rights reserved.

Read more reviews of Dakine gear
Read more gear reviews by Mike Wilkie

Reviews > Packs > Internal and External Framed Backpacks > Dakine Outtabounds Pack > Test Report by Mike Wilkie



Product tested and reviewed in each Formal Test Report has been provided free of charge by the manufacturer to BackpackGearTest.org. Upon completion of the Test Series the writer is permitted to keep the product. Owner Reviews are based on product owned by the reviewer personally unless otherwise noted.

If you are an avid backpacker, we are always looking for enthusiastic, quality reviewers. Apply here to be a gear tester.


All material on this site is the exclusive property of BackpackGearTest.org.
BackpackGearTest software copyright David Anderson