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Reviews > Shelters > Tents > Black Diamond One Shot Tent > Test Report by Thomas Vickers

Black Diamond OneShot Tent
Long Term Report
July 31, 2007

 

Thomas Vickers

39 years old
Male
5 ft 11 in tall (1.8 m)
175 lb (79 kg)
redroach@pobox.com
Southeast Texas, Houston Area


Tester Background:
I grew up in the piney woods of southeast Texas. Camping was a quick trip into the mosquito-infested woods behind the house. My style has evolved and over the last 4 or 5 years, I have begun to take a lighter weight approach to hiking gear (I still use sleeping bags and tents, just lighter versions). While I have flirted with lightweight hiking, I feel that I am more of a mid-weight hiker now. My philosophy is one of comfort, while carrying the lightest load possible.

OneShot Side View

 

Manufacturer Information:

Manufacturer: Black Diamond Equipment

Website: http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com

Colors available: Maize
Fabric: Epic, Silicon coated ripstop nylon
Year Manufactured: 2006

Tent Dimensions: 85 x 36 x 36 in (216 x 91 x 91 cm)
Tent Area:
21.25 sq ft ( 2 M2)
Packed size: 6 x 9 in (15 x 23 cm)

Weight (a
s packaged): 2 lb 13 oz (1.28 kg)
Weight (tent and poles): 2 lb 5 oz (1.04 kg)
Weight (ground cloth): 6.4 oz (182 g)


MSRP: $ 289.95 US

Information From Tester:
(all measurements approximate)


Color: Maize

Pole Sack:
Weight: 0.60 oz (17 g)
Dimensions:
21 x 5.5 in (53 x 14 cm)

Stuff sack (tent):
Weight: 0.80 oz (23 g)
Dimensions:
11 x 9 in (28 x 23 cm)

Pole 1:
Length (folded):
15.5 in (39 cm)
Length (extended):
117 in (297 cm)
Weight:
5.85 oz (166 g)

Pole 2:
Length (folded):
15.5 in (39 cm)
Length (extended):
117 in (297 cm)
Weight:
5.85 oz (166 g)

Pole 3:
Length (folded):
15.5 in (39 cm)
Length (extended):
36 in (91 cm)
Weight:
1.95 oz (56 g)

Stake:
Length:
7 in (18 cm)
Weight:
0.50 oz (13 g)

Tent Body:
Weight:
1 lb 8.05 oz (682 g)
Dimensions:
83 x 33 x 33 in (211 x 84 x 84 cm)

Footprint:
Weight:
6.20 oz (175 g)
Dimensions:
80 x 31 in (203 x 79 cm)



Initial Report

Initial Tester Expectations:
After visiting the Black Diamond website I came away with the idea that the OneShot was going to be an interesting one person free standing tent.  The website contained tons of measurements and other technical data about the tent, its size, and its construction.  I came away with few doubts about what I would be testing. I feel that the Black Diamond provides the type of data that I want to see when researching a gear purchase. Not only was there plenty of data, but the site was easy to navigate and the information was just as easy to access.

Packed OneShot shelter

Arrival:
When I unpacked the Black Diamond OneShot shelter I was very surprised to see how compact it was.  The shelter was in one gray silnylon stuff sack and the poles were in another gray silnylon stuff sack. The two were attached by two loops of 3/4 inch (2 cm) wide elastic and even combined this way, this shelter and its components were small. Attached to the larger stuff sack was a small booklet which contains instructions and specifications on the Black Diamond superlight tent series, which includes the OneShot.   This booklet contains information on measurements, use, care and maintenance on all the superlight tents in three languages.  From my best guess, the languages are English (I am sure on this one), French, and German.  As I looked through the booklet, I discovered that the dimensions of the OneShot in the booklet are different from the dimensions of the OneShot given on the website.  I don't know if this is significant, but one set of measurements is probably wrong.

I started by separating the two stuff sacks. The smaller (pole) stuff sack slid out of the elastic loops which were attached to the larger (tent) stuff sack.  Both bags are closed by using the cord and cord-lock that is present at the mouth of each sack.   The larger of the two contained the entire body of the OneShot shelter.  I got a good surprise when I opened the pole sack and began to pull things out.  The first things that I pulled out were the three poles.  After that, I noticed there was a smaller stuff sack (4 x 8 in/10 x 20 cm) sewn into the interior of the pole stuff sack.   I could not remove the smaller sack, but I did begin to remove its contents.   I found six Y-shaped aluminum stakes, extra tie out cord for the shelter (28 ft/8.5 m), a 1.5 oz (42.5 g) tube of Sil-Net seam sealer, a syringe ( I assume is for seam sealing the shelter), and a folding set of instructions for setting up the shelter. Wow!!! This was a ton of good stuff and it made the OneShot complete right out of the box. 

Also included was the ground cloth/footprint for use with the Black Diamond OneShot shelter.  This is rectangular nylon sheet that has grommets in each corner (and one in the middle of each side) and a length of elastic cord tied through each of the corner grommets. 

Description from the Manufacturer:

"The OneShot is a three-season, freestanding solo shelter that is roomy enough to sit up in, yet packs down small and weighs less than some bivy sacks. Using a two-and-a-half pole design similar to the Lighthouse, the OneShot offers a full side-opening door with a built-in window and another window on the opposite side with awnings over both. The canopy is built with highly water-resistant and breathable Epic by Nextec fabric, and the trapezoidal floor is made of double silicone coated nylon ripstop. To keep your small items safe, the OneShot has two interior net pockets."

OneShot front view

Tester's Description:
The Black Diamond OneShot shelter is a free standing single piece shelter.   I had expected a typical tent (fly and tent body), but the OneShot is one piece and the fly and body are integrated.  There is  a single door on one side of the shelter which unzips to completely expose the interior of the shelter.  There are two mesh windows (one in the door) on either side of the shelter.  These windows are covered by the side awnings of the shelter and can be zipped open or closed, depending on ventilation needs within the OneShot.  There are also two mesh pockets located on either side of the shelter's interior along the sides, not the ends of the OneShot.

The shelter is assembled by using two long shock-corded poles and one short shock-corded pole.  Each of the long poles has nine individual sections that assemble to create the pole while the shorter pole has only three sections. The poles are secured inside the shelter body and are held in place by snaps (in the corners of the shelter body) and by hook and loop fasteners along the top of the shelter body interior.  The corners are reinforced material and contain snaps for the ends of the support poles.  There are tie out loops for stakes at each of the exterior corners and extra tie out loops on each end of the tent (2 per end, approximately 16 in /41 cm from the ground). 

Initial Impressions:
About all I can here is "Wow."  I had fully expected a tent.   The OneShot is a different bird all together. The first surprise was the integral shelter body and fly.  The OneShot is one big piece. The next surprise was the pole system.  The shorter, cross-pole was easy enough to figure out, but the two longer poles took some figuring out when it came time to get them assembled and into the shelter.   I feel that after the first set up, this process will get much easier with practice.  The instructions provided with the shelter were clear, I was just having a difficult time because the last thing I wanted to do was poke a hole in this item before I even got to test it.

Other than the surprise of the OneShot being a single piece body, the shelter is just about what I expected.  It has a nice large half-moon shaped door that allows easy entry and exit from the tent.  During the first phase of testing I will be better able to assess the interior size of this shelter and see how reality compares to my mental picture.

Test Strategy:

Here are some questions that I plan on using as a guide for my testing of the Black Diamond OneShot Shelter

FIT:
1. How much room is there inside the OneShot? Will it hold me, my pack, gear, and a sleeping pad?

2. How well do I fit through the door on this tent? Will it require any special contortionist skills to get in and out of?

3. Can I really sit up in this tent? Black Diamond claims that I can and for many people (not me) sitting up is a feature that they can not do without in a shelter.  

USAGE:
1. How much is the actual pack weight (tent, fly, poles, stakes)? How close is it to the claimed weight of 2 lb 5 oz (1.04 kg)?

2. How many stakes does it take to secure the OneShot? Is it a free standing tent that can be pitched without stakes? How does the OneShot handle wind with/without being staked down?

3. How easy is it to pitch the OneShot? Is the 2 pole design easy to handle and set up? How hard is it to clip the fly to the poles/body of the tent?

4. Will the Epic canopy (fly) keep me dry? Can the canopy 'wet through' if it gets wet enough? How bad is the condensation on the underside of the canopy in high humidity situations? Is there enough airflow between the canopy and tent to prevent the build up of condensation? Does the canopy breathe well enough to prevent condensation?

5. How easy is it to pitch the canopy with the poles, but not the tent body? Can it even be used this way?

6. How well to the two side windows ventilate the tent? Is the ventilation adequate enough to prevent condensation in the tent?  How easy/difficult is it to adjust the ventilation while in the tent? 

CONSTRUCTION/DURABILITY:
1. How well do the Epic canopy and the nylon floor hold up to serious use? No abuse here, just repeated stuffings and pitching in the course of hiking trips?

2. How durable are the poles of this tent? Will they hold up to the repeated cycle of being put together and taken apart?

3. How well does the zipper on the side door work? Will it jam, snag or break through normal usage?

Final thoughts:
The Black Diamond OneShot Shelter was not exactly what I expected.  The shelter utilizes a 'unibody' construction that melds the fly and tent body into one piece.    It is actually more in less of a package, which I am intrigues me a great deal at this point.  The size is one thing that is as I expected. It appears to be roomy enough, but I still need to get on the trail and see how the shelter, my gear, and myself go together inside or if I have to make some changes. 

Overall, I am pleased with what I have experienced so far.  The quality of the construction appears to be quite high and I am going to be interested to see how well the construction holds to the demands of this unique shelter design.

Field Test Report
June 3, 2007

CONDITIONS AND LOCATIONS:
Night temperatures:
46 to 67 F (8 to 19 C)
Location: Sam Houston National Forest
Trip 1:
3 nights
Trip 2:
1 night
Trip 3:
3 nights

Packing:

Normally I just stuff my tent into my pack and don't use a stuff sack. It is second to go in after my sleeping bag and if the tent has a fly I wrap the sleeping bag in it.  The Black Diamond OneShot was so small when it is in its stuff sack, I decided on my first trip that I was going to go ahead and leave it in there. I think that breaking my own rules paid off this time.  Five of my seven nights in the OneShot have involved rain and I felt much better about stuffing the shelter back into its stuff sack if it was damp rather than straight into my pack. 

Setting it up:
I was hoping that after putting the OneShot up and taking it down repeatedly that I would develop a system that would make it easier. The bad news is that so far, I was wrong. My average set up time is about ten minutes and that is rather on the fast side for this shelter.  What seems like an easy  job usually becomes a strange and twisted wrestling match between myself, the interior poles, and the shelter's body.  I don't really think that there is a fast and easy way to set the OneShot up as long as I worry about punching a hole in the shelter with the poles. I have learned to take it slow and just do the best that I can. It may not be perfect, but the shelter stays up and I am happy.

I have learned a couple of tricks that make setting this shelter up just a bit easier, but not easy.  The first is that I have given up on trying to get the poles into the sewn in interior guide loops. These are small loops of Epic fabric that hang from the interior of the shelter. They are obviously meant to guide the poles into their proper positions (along with the hook and loop fasteners), but I can never get the OneShot set up with the poles in the proper guide loops, so I have stopped trying.  The other trick involves the pole sack that comes with the OneShot.  Sewn into this bag is an interior pocket for stakes.  I made the goof of trying to get the folded poles out of the pole sack with the stakes in the interior pocket.  I am pretty sure that it is impossible after attempting to do so for about five minutes in the rain. Now I simply dump all the stakes out of the interior pocket and the pull the poles out. Faster, easier, and much less frustrating for me, especially when I know the next step is getting the poles assembled and into the shelter.

Getting in and out:
The door on the OneShot is great. It unzips the entire side of the shelter and there is plenty of room to crawl in. I want to emphasize the crawling part. I have to get down on my knees and crawl inside, then turn and zip the door closed.  This really isn't a complaint since I have to crawl into almost all of my backpacking tents. The only problem I have with this involves getting low enough not to bump the awning that sticks out a bit over the door. Bumping the awning can have bad consequences, especially when there is rain involved.  When getting into or out of the OneShot I have found that it is best to shake the tent rather heavily so that any water that has built up along the top can run off. I found this out one morning when I did not shake the shelter (by pushing on the roof from inside) before I unzipped the door and exited. There was water in the tent and on myself when I bumped against the OneShot as I crawled out.  I made the same mistake as I entered the OneShot later in the day. So now I have a simple "shake the tent first" philosophy when it comes to getting into or out of the OneShot in moist conditions.

Now I'm in:
My first three nights in the tent were pretty amazing. I wrote my initial report posted it and headed out to the Sam Houston National Forest.  The first three nights included at least 4 in (15 cm) of heavy rain.  As is my normal practice (and because I had no time) I did not seam seal the OneShot before I hit the trail, despite expecting rain on this trip.

I settled into the OneShot for the evening after heating and preparing my dinner.  With no real vestibule to cook under, I had to don my rain gear and cook in the rain. This doesn't bother me, but it did mean that I had a bigger decision to make about where to keep my pack.  I gave in and emptied the pack contents into the OneShot and put the pack itself under my feet.  It was a bit cramped inside, especially because my boots had to come in as well, but I made do.  Being able to sit up and eat was a very nice thing (even if I was hunched over) at this point, but the night was still young. 

When I finally settled in to sleep, I made sure the window and vent were zipped closed because I was afraid of the wind blowing rain inside the shelter.  I had probably been reading for about forty five minutes when I discovered something interesting.  A seam near my head, where the door zipper attached to the tent body was leaking.  It was raining pretty hard and I could actually see the water beading up on the stitching and then running down the tent body.  At first I started to freak out, but I also noticed that the water was pooling in one of the reinforced corner pockets where the poles snap into place. I stuffed my pack towel into the corner and went back to reading and eventually to sleep.  In the morning I was still dry, but the pack towel was soaked.  I had to wring it out once I got up and moving for the day. 

The rain didn't reappear for a few hours so I got a chance to dry the OneShot off a bit and head further down the trail. I finally found the campsite I wanted and this is where I spent the next two nights.  When the rain came back, so did the leak, so I kept the pack towel stuffed in that corner of the tent.  I just wrung it out in the morning and let it dry as much as it could between rain showers.

Black Diamond recommends that I seam seal the OneShot and this is a normal recommendation or most tents that I have used.  What impressed me about my wet nights in the OneShot was the fact that there are a lot of seam areas in this unibody shelter and only one small spot leaked. For me, this means that the shelter is constructed very well and I am rather excited with its performance in the rain. I don't see the water issue pre-seam sealing as a defect or problem.  In fact, it gave me a rather good idea of where to concentrate when I do get around to sealing the seams. 

I also noticed that the Epic fabric of the shelter doesn't seem to really get wet. Water stands and beads on it and can be shaken off. I still had to pack it into its stuff sack while damp because I couldn't seem to shake all the water off the shelter in the morning.  This wasn't a huge issue since I had used the stuff sack, but I quickly figured out that using the stuff sack is a must if I expect wet conditions.
 
Final thoughts:
I spent four more nights in the OneShot shelter.  Three of these nights included even more rain, which causes me to fear that I have found a real rain magnet.  Because of the rain, I am going to research seam sealing the OneShot.  I cannot find instructions with the materials that came with the shelter, so I will go online and try and figure the procedure out.  The best news is that I can stop the leak, if I can figure out the seam sealing process. Even better in my opinion is that I only have to make sure that I get one portion sealed correctly, so I can experiment a bit with the rest of the seams till I feel that I have the process down pat.

After my first three nights in the OneShot I discovered that despite its appearances, it is a bit snug for me. If I lie on my back and stretch out, my head and feet brush up against the opposite ends of the tent. This isn't too much of an issue since I prefer to sleep on my side with my legs bent, but for anyone approaching 6 feet (1.8 meters) in height or more, it could be. Throw in my boots, food, and pack, and the arrangements get even more cramped.  I still think this is an acceptable trade-off for the shelter's weight and it won't be as much as an issue when I venture into areas where I need to hang my food outside the shelter and when there is no rain forcing me to bring my pack into the tent with me.

I can sit up in the OneShot, but only if I a)hunch my shoulders/head over and b) sit facing the door. If I try and sit hunched over facing the ends of the shelter, then my shoulders rub against the walls of the OneShot.  I don't find this overly disturbing because when I consider the weight of this shelter, there has to be some sort of trade-off.  My only concern has been if rubbing against the walls of the shelter will cause water to wet through the fabric and get me wet. This hasn't happened, mainly because I took great pains not to bump the tent. More than likely I did on accident without realizing it, but I didn't notice any wet through.

I have not seen or dealt with condensation on the interior of the OneShot yet and I think this may have something to do with the relatively low (for Texas) night time temperatures and the breathability of the Epic fabric the shelter is made of.   My first three nights I kept the windows shut to keep rain out and warmth in, but for the remaining nights I had to keep the windows open. I would get warm in the tent, then open windows, and then the temperatures seemed to adjust to a comfortable level for me. On my last night I tested just how much of a variance in temperatures there was by using a thermometer inside and outside the tent. I started off with my reading of the interior of the tent with the windows shut. The thermometer read 80 F (27 C) and I was rather humid and warm, so I zipped open both of the windows. When I woke up about 45 minutes later, the thermometer read 76 F (24 C).  The next time I woke, I checked the interior temperature (76 F/24 C) and the put the thermometer outside.  Within twenty minutes I got a reading of 67 F(19 C) outside the tent. 

I was impressed since this seemed to be what happened on the prior night when I didn't keep a close tab on the temperature.

Overall, I like the OneShot shelter. It provides cover from the elements at a great pack weight. While I would prefer a vestibule or awning that gives me more cover for gear storage or cooking, the lack of one doesn't kill my impressions of this shelter. One thing that I do like a lot about the OneShot is how easy it is to move once it is set up.   Even with a sleeping bag, sleeping pad, and pillow in the inside, it is easy for me to pick the entire shelter up and move it to a better spot when or if I need to.  That is something I know I am going enjoy when I visit areas that have less than favorable camp sites and a move might be necessary.

Long Term Report
June 31, 2007

CONDITIONS AND LOCATIONS:
Night temperatures:
70 to 80 F (21 to 27 C)
Location: Sam Houston National Forest
Trip 1:
3 nights
Trip 2:
2 nights

Things finally heat up:
My last couple of trips in the OneShot included more rain, but also some blazing summer heat for the first time during this test.  I discovered that daytime temperatures in excess of 90 F (32 C) make the OneShot more than a little unlivable during the day. Of course the problem of this shelter being an oven in the summer heat was made worse by the fact that most of my campsites along the LoneStar Trail were in open areas, which meant little or no shade till late in the day.

Hot afternoon in the OneShot

It was days like the one in the picture above where I pitched the tent in the late afternoon and went and walked under the trees till everything cooled off enough for me actually hide in the shelter.  It was also on these warmer nights that I discovered that I had to keep both windows open for ventilation or I got way too hot for comfort. 

The good news was that even in the heat and rather high humidity (75% +) I still didn't have any condensation problems.  The windows seem pretty small to provide all the ventilation needed to prevent condensation, so I have to believe that the Epic fabric lived up to its hype of being breathable.

I would really like to have seen bigger zip open windows. More exposed mesh would have meant cooler nights in the Texas heat and would have made me just a bit happier.  I would also have been able to watch what was going on around me while lying down, instead of having to sit up or prop myself up in order to peer out of a window.

One other thing that I tried during this part of the test was carrying the OneShot without its stuff sack. I simply stuffed the shelter into my pack on top of my sleeping bag and then put everything else in on top of it. This is the way that I normally carry my shelters, but I really think that I prefer putting the OneShot in its stuff sack.   The stuffed shelter is so small, it just seems to take up much less room than when it is allowed free range privileges in my pack.

Questions answered:
FIT:
1. How much room is there inside the OneShot? Will it hold me, my pack, gear, and a sleeping pad?
Yes, barely. I can get my pack, my boots, rain gear and other extras (including a pillow) into the OneShot, but it does get cramped inside very quickly.   I preferred just to keep my sleeping pad, pillow, and sleeping bag inside with me, but due to the rain my boots were also a constant companions as well.

2. How well do I fit through the door on this tent? Will it require any special contortionist skills to get in and out of?
I had to crawl in and out, but the door opened wide and was easy for me to enter and exit through. I did learn that I needed to shake the OneShot from inside before I got out on rainy days to clear water off the top of the shelter. I also had to shake it off before I entered on rainy days because when I failed to do so, I got water on myself and inside the shelter.

3. Can I really sit up in this tent? Black Diamond claims that I can and for many people (not me) sitting up is a feature that they can not do without in a shelter.  
I can sit up hunched over (with my legs crossed) facing one of the tent windows. My shoulders rub the sides when I try and sit up for any length of time facing the ends of the OneShot. So I can do it, but is not as comfortable as it sounds.

USAGE:
1. How much is the actual pack weight (tent, fly, poles, stakes)? How close is it to the claimed weight of 2 lb 5 oz (1.04 kg)?
According to my measurements, the tent and poles came in just 1 oz (28 g) over the claimed weight. This did not include stakes or the footprint.

2. How many stakes does it take to secure the OneShot? Is it a free standing tent that can be pitched without stakes? How does the OneShot handle wind with/without being staked down?
I never used more than four stakes to secure this shelter. There are tie out points for more cords and stakes, but I never needed them. Most of the time I only used two stakes on opposite corners of the shelter. The OneShot is definitely free standing and doesn't need stakes if I am in the shelter. Without me in the OneShot, my pad and sleeping bag were not enough to keep it safely in place. I never dealt with any really high winds, but I never felt secure about leaving the shelter up without at least two stakes if I wasn't going to be inside it.

3. How easy is it to pitch the OneShot? Is the 2 pole design easy to handle and set up? How hard is it to clip the fly to the poles/body of the tent?
In my opinion there is just no good or easy way to pitch the OneShot.  The main concern that I have always had is how to get the poles securely inside the shelter body without poking a hole in the OneShot.  I never poked any holes, but I always felt that I was one flick of a pole away, not matter how many different ways I tried. Once I got the poles inside and situated, it was pretty easy to use the hook and loop fasteners to secure the poles, but getting to that point was always frustrating and sometimes verged on acrobatic.

4. Will the Epic canopy (fly) keep me dry? Can the canopy 'wet through' if it gets wet enough? How bad is the condensation on the underside of the canopy in high humidity situations? Is there enough airflow between the canopy and tent to prevent the build up of condensation? Does the canopy breathe well enough to prevent condensation?
I spent several rainy nights in the OneShot. The shelter body never 'wet through' and it kept me extremely dry. I also feel that the shelter breathes very well. I never had a condensation problem and this really surprised me considering the climate here in Texas. 

5. How easy is it to pitch the canopy with the poles, but not the tent body? Can it even be used this way?
The OneShot is a single body shelter. There is no separate canopy/fly and tent body because they are all rolled into one piece of fabric. While this design seemed strange to me, it did reduce the OneShot's weight and give it a very small footprint in my pack.

6. How well to the two side windows ventilate the tent? Is the ventilation adequate enough to prevent condensation in the tent?  How easy/difficult is it to adjust the ventilation while in the tent? 
The two windows do ventilate and cool the tent. When they are shut, the temperature inside the OneShot is definitely several degrees warmer than the outside air. I consider this a big plus in colder areas, but it tended to work against me during the summer. I kept the windows open during the long term test phase in order to keep the temperatures down inside the OneShot, but I think that larger windows would have helped to cool the interior in hotter climates.  I think the combination of the windows and the breathability of the Epic fabric are more than adequate to prevent condensation.

CONSTRUCTION/DURABILITY:
1. How well do the Epic canopy and the nylon floor hold up to serious use? No abuse here, just repeated stuffings and pitching in the course of hiking trips?
I was always worried that I was going to snag the floor on a sticker vine of some sort, but it never happened. I brushed branches and all sorts of plants with the OneShot when I was setting it up and I have not seen a single sign of serious wear and tear. I stuffed it in the stuff sack, carried it without the stuff sack, and put the OneShot through many wet/dry cycles due to the weather and I think that it still looks brand new.

2. How durable are the poles of this tent? Will they hold up to the repeated cycle of being put together and taken apart?
I am amazed that the poles bend as much as they do, but hold up so well. My initial fear was that the amount of tension needed to put the poles in place was going to cause problems, but they have held up really well over the course of this test.

3. How well does the zipper on the side door work? Will it jam, snag or break through normal usage?
All the zippers on the OneShot have worked great. They slide really well and I have never had issues with them snagging me or the shelter body.

Conclusions:
The Black Diamond OneShot is a unique shelter in its design and function. I know that I have repeatedly cried about the fact that I would prefer a bigger vestibule for boot storage, but all in all, the OneShot is pretty impressive. It weighs just what I want a one man shelter to weigh and it takes up a much smaller spot in my pack than any other shelter I have carried.  A lot of shelters make huge promises, but never quite deliver, but this was definitely not the case with the OneShot. While the design was different from what I had expected, its functionality and durability were excellent.   

Despite my issues with pitching this shelter, I can say that it kept me dry through one of the wettest summers I have ever seen here in Texas. If nothing else, the OneShot keeps the weather out and me happy on the inside. I can't ask for much more out of a one person shelter, especially when the shelter is as nice as the OneShot.




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