BackpackGearTest
  Home Guest - Not logged in 

Reviews > Sleep Gear > Sleeping Bags > Selkbag Patagon Sleep System > Test Report by Frances Penn

SELK'BAG PATAGON
TEST SERIES BY FRANCES PENN
LONG-TERM REPORT
April 25, 2014

CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO THE FIELD REPORT
CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO THE LONG-TERM REPORT

TESTER INFORMATION

NAME: Frances Penn
EMAIL: oldhikergirl AT yahoo DOT com
AGE: 57
LOCATION: Santa Ana, California
GENDER: F
HEIGHT: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
WEIGHT: 130 lb (59.00 kg)

I have been backpacking for six years mostly on long weekends in Southern California with two or more 5-day trips per year in the Sierras. My total daypack weight, including food and water, is usually 15 lb (7 kg) and my total backpack weight, including food and water, is usually 26-30 lb (12-14 kg) depending on the need for a bear canister. I have recently converted to a tarp, bivy and quilt sleeping system instead of a tent. I have experienced all night rain, hail, heavy winds, camping in snow once, but mostly fair weather.


INITIAL REPORT

PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

Manufacturer: MusucHouse Ltda
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Manufacturer's Website: http://www.selkbagworld.com
MSRP: US $259
Listed Weight: 4 lb 6 oz (1.98 kg) including compression bag
Measured Weight: 4 lb 7 oz (2.01 kg) including compression bag
Insulation: KrekranŽ 2 layers of 130g/m2 each, 100% Polyester Synthetic
Lining: 40D Nylon with a water resistant finish
Shell: 40D Nylon Ripstop with a water resistant finish
Temp Rating: Comfort 44°F (6 C); Limit 35°F (2 C); Extreme 9°F (13 C)(per EN13537 standard, see below for explanation)
Available Sizes: Medium, Large and Extra Large
Product Measurements:
Medium: 72 in (183 cm) wide by 73 in high (185 cm)
Large: 79 in (201 cm) wide by 79 in (201 cm) high
Extra Large: 84 in (213 cm) wide x 86 in (218 cm) high
Carry Size:
Medium: 15 in (38 cm) by 9 in (23 cm)
Large:15 in (38 cm) by 10 in (25 cm) with a circumference of 25 in (64 cm)
Extra Large: 16 in (40 cm) by 10 in (25 cm)
Carry Weight:
Medium: 4.0 lb (113 g)
Large: 4.3 lb (125 g)
Extra Large: 4.7 lb (133 g)
Medium size fits 5 ft 1 in (160 cm) to 5 ft 5 in (169 cm) height
Large size fits 5 ft 6 in (170 cm) to 6 ft 0 in (184 cm) height
Extra Large size fits 6 ft 1 in (185 cm) to 6 ft 6 in (202 cm) height
Size Tested: Large
Colors Available: Black Forest
Color Tested: Black Forest

IMAGE 1
Fran wearing bag


The Selk'Bag Patagon is a sleep system designed by Rodrigo Alonso Schramm in Santiago, Chile. The user can walk around while wearing the bag similar to a warm pair of overalls. The bag is meant to replace the traditional sleeping bag. The bag has an anatomical two-dimensional fit. The Patagon model of Selk'Bag has zip off booties to allow the user to wear their own footwear. For comparison, all previous versions of the Selk'Bag had the booties attached permanently. The booties have 1680 D Poly Oxford on the bottom with two strips of a stronger non-slip material. The booties zip off at the ankles. There are drawstrings just above the booties zippers to adjust for a tighter fit. There are little pockets just above the drawstings to stuff the drawstrings into to prevent tripping while walking.

IMAGE 2
booties-one tightened, one not tightened


A quick release closure system on the sleeves uses magnets for fast hand exit and entry. The bag has hook and loop straps that serve to 'roll-up' the Patagon's sleeves for access to the hands. The bag has an insulated hood, a thermal collar around the head and neck and exaggerated draft tubes around the zippers to reduce heat loss. The hood has a drawstring around the face.

IMAGE 3
hand opening


IMAGE 4
hand opening fastened back


The bag has double front entry zippers. The zippers also have wide reflective ribbon sewed on the draft tubes to prevent snags and make the zippers easy to locate. The zippers run on both sides of the chest from the top. The zipper on the left side is 16 in (40 cm) long. The zipper on the right side is 29 in (74 cm) long. The right zipper can be opened from the top down or the bottom up for quick access to pants pockets and for ventilation. This bag does not have any pockets.

IMAGE 5
right long front zipper


The bag also has vents with mesh along the outside of the legs that start at my mid-thigh and run down to my mid-shin. Both side leg vents measure 12 in ( 30 cm).

IMAGE 6
side leg vent


This is the information on the end of the compression sack.

IMAGE 7
end of compression sack


According to my internet search, the EN13537 designation is a European standard for sleeping bag manufacturers that measures four temperature ratings:
Upper Limit - the temperature at which a standard man can sleep without excessive perspiration. It is established with the hood and zippers open and with the arms outside of the bag.
Comfort - the temperature at which a standard woman can expect to sleep comfortably in a relaxed position.
Lower Limit - the temperature at which a standard man can sleep for eight hours in a curled position without waking.
Extreme - the minimum temperature at which a standard woman can remain for six hours without risk of death from hypothermia (though frostbite is still possible).
For the purpose of these measurements, a "standard man" is assumed to be 25 years old, with a height of 5'6" (1.73 m) and a weight of 161 lb (73 kg); a "standard woman" is assumed to be 25 years old, with a height of 5'2" (1.60 m) and a weight of 132 lb (60 kg).

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS

The bag arrived packed in its compression sack. It was rolled so tight, it was very difficult to remove. I was concerned that I would not be able to get the bag back into its compression sack after that experience. After several attempts, I was finally able to stuff the bag back into its compression sack.

The bag is double padded equally in all areas. There does not appear to be any area that is padded more or less than any other area.

READING THE INSTRUCTIONS

The instructions provide a lot of information about sizing and features but do not mention anything about washing details. Since the materials are all synthetic, I would expect the bag will wash under normal machine settings. The instructions indicate the booties zip together to be used as a pillow. After walking around on the ground, I can't imagine wanting to put my head on them for a pillow but I will try it in the field report portion of this test series.

TRYING IT OUT

The bag feels like a very warm pair of overalls. The bag fit my height and was loose fitting in the legs which I expect will be comfortable for sleeping. I look forward to making breakfast in the morning without having to get out of my warm sleeping bag. I look forward to sitting in camp at night knowing I am also warming my sleep system. The booties fit me very loosely and I almost tripped within the first few minutes of wearing them zipped on the bag. Once I zipped off the booties and put on my own shoes, I found this bag to be a comfortably loose fit. I was in our cabin in Big Bear so I immediately went outside for a walk around the neighborhood wearing my own shoes. The temperature was 40 F (4 C) that night and I was warm on my short walk under the stars. I then pulled the drawstring around my ankles and had less loose material between my ankles while walking. This configuration felt better and much less like a tripping hazard. The booties fit better when the drawstring is pulled tight, but the two layers of material feel too slippery under my feet. Preliminarily, I like wearing my own shoes for walking. I will see how this works in the field.

Since there is no rear trap door, I am concerned that I will have to remove the bag for nightly bathroom calls. I will report on this aspect of the bag in my field report.

SUMMARY

I look forward to getting this interesting bag into the field for some hands-on testing in the coming winter months. I will be doing my snow dance.


FIELD REPORT

FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

Trip #1:
Location: Big Bear, California USA
Elevation: 7,000 ft (2,100 M)
Trip Duration: 2 days, 1 night
Trail Conditions: dirt forest trail with some rocky portions
Temperatures: 35 to 60 F (1 to 15 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with a cool night

Trip #2
Location: San Jacinto State Park, California USA
Elevation: 10,860 ft (3,310 M)
Trip Duration: 2 days, 1 night
Trail Conditions: dirt forest trail with some rocky portions with small snow patches
Temperatures: 35 to 60 F (1 to 15 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with wind during the night

Trip #3:
Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California USA
Elevation: 3,200 ft (975 M)
Trip Duration: 3 days, 2 nights
Trail Conditions: sandy desert off trail with lots of desert cactus to avoid
Temperatures: 35 to 60 F (1 to 15 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with light winds during the day and heavier winds at night

Trip #4:
Location: Big Bear, California USA
Elevation: 7,000 ft (2,100 M)
Trip Duration: 2 days, 1 night
Trail Conditions: dirt forest trail with some rocky portions
Temperatures: 30 to 50 F (-1 to 10 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with a cool night

Trip #5
Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California USA
Elevation: 3,200 ft (975 M)
Trip Duration: 2 days, 1 nights
Trail Conditions: sandy desert off trail with lots of desert cactus
Temperatures: 30 to 50 F (-1 to 10 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with a cool night

Trip #6:
Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California USA
Elevation: 3,200 ft (975 M)
Trip Duration: 3 days, 2 nights
Trail Conditions: sandy desert off trail with lots of desert cactus
Temperatures: 40 to 70 F (4 to 21 C)
Weather: unseasonably warm and sunny with light winds during the day

Trip #7:
Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California USA
Elevation: 4,500 ft (1,372 M)
Trip Duration: 3 days, 2 nights
Trail Conditions: sandy desert off trail with lots of desert cactus
Temperatures: 25 to 50 F (-3 to 10 C)
Weather: mostly sunny with winds during half of the days and nights

PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

On the Big Bear trip, I slept in the Patagon in my bivy under a tarp with my sleeping pad inside the bivy. I wore a pair of fleece tights, fleece socks, a fleece hat, a thermal top and a lightweight synthetic jacket. I walked around with the booties attached. The ground was mostly clean dirt and the booties fit loose and the bottom was slippery. I was warm enough at night in camp and while sleeping. In the morning, I was warm enough to remove the Patagon once breakfast was ready.

On the San Jacinto trip, I slept in the Patagon in my bivy under a tarp with my sleeping pad inside the bivy. I wore a pair of fleece tights, fleece socks, fleece hat, a thermal top with a wool shirt on top and a synthetic lightweight jacket on top of that. Since the Patagon doesn't have a rear trap door, I was concerned I would be cold during my nightly bathroom calls if I wasn't dressed warm enough under the Patagon. It was necessary to completely remove the Patagon for bathroom calls to prevent accidentally soiling the Patagon in the dark. This area is heavily forested and the booties became full of sap and pine needles. The booties fit me loose even when the drawstring is pulled tight. The grip strips on the bottom do not provide much traction, so I wore my down booties inside the attached booties to give me more secure footing on uneven terrain. This resulted in the bottoms of my down booties getting sap and needles on them and on the inside of the attached booties after bathroom calls.

On the first Joshua Tree trip, I slept in a tent. The first night, I wore my thermal top, my fleece tights and fleece socks. Because I had not cleaned the sap and pine needles off of the booties from the San Jacinto trip, I unzipped the booties and wore my down booties. I recall being a little cold at one point in the night. I put the lightweight synthetic jacket over my head and eventually went to sleep. The second night, I wore the thermal top, a wool shirt, fleece tights, fleece socks, and a fleece hat. I was warm all night wearing this set of clothing.

On the last Joshua tree trip where the weather was much colder, I slept in my bivy with several nearby bivy friends. I didn't use a tarp. I wore a thermal top, wool shirt, fleece tights, fleece hat, fleece neck gaiter, fleece socks, and down booties. The Patagon booties were not attached to make walking around camp easier and safer. The first night, I was warm most of the night. The second night was below freezing and I was cold during bathroom calls. I had to wrap a fleece top around my feet and I put on my down jacket under the Patagon. Since all of the water bottles were frozen in the morning, it was obviously below freezing most of the night. It was on this trip that I found the temperature minimum of 30 F (-1 C) for my sleeping comfort in the Patagon. Since the nighttime temperature was below freezing, my bathroom calls were a very cold but fast event.

On all of the trips, I really enjoyed not having to get out of my warm sleeping bag in the morning to make breakfast. I also enjoyed being able to slip the Patagon on in the evening and be warm enough to sit around camp prior to going to bed, all the while knowing I was warming my sleeping bag and didn't have to crawl into a cold sleeping bag when it was time to go to bed. I consider these features to be the best part of wearing the Patagon. The booties fit my feet loose. The drawstring helps to tighten the booties around my ankles, but they are still loose and feel slippery on the bottom. The grip strips on the bottom of the booties help, but do not provide enough traction without wearing my down booties inside the attached booties.

IMAGE 1
making dinner on the San Jacinto trip

SUMMARY

The Patagon when packed in its compression sack is larger and heavier than my down sleeping bag and my down quilt. The Patagon fits in the bottom of my large backpack, but just barely.

Things I Like:
Not having to get out of my warm sleeping bag to make breakfast in the morning.
Being able to sit around camp after dinner while warming my sleeping bag.
Being able to crawl into my bivy or tent already in my warm sleeping bag.
The fact that the booties are detachable.

Things I Don't Like:
The weight is heavier than I prefer to carry on backpack trips.
The bulky size when packed in its compression sack.
The slippery feel of my feet inside the booties.
No rear trap door for bathroom calls.
There are no pockets.

After this test is finished, I will most likely wear the Patagon for car camping trips only. I leave you with a picture of me enjoying the Patagon in the wilderness.

IMAGE 2
I'm warm!




LONG-TERM REPORT

LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

Trip #8:
Location: Mojave National Monument, California USA
Elevation: 5,700 ft (1,737 M)
Trip Duration: 2 days, 1 night
Trail Conditions: sandy desert off trail
Temperatures: 40 to 80 F (22 to 44 C)
Weather: sunny days and windy at night

PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

One last trip and another opportunity to use the Patagon. I enjoyed being warm while wearing the Patagon sitting at the campfire and for the evening walk around camp before going to bed. The weather turned windy during the night and I got cold. I put my jacket over my legs and feet. That was all I needed to get warm enough to fall back asleep.

During this test, it is clear that my temperature limit for warmth as mentioned above is 30 F (-1 C). Any colder and I need my jacket over me to stay warm.

SUMMARY

I have enjoyed wearing the Patagon, especially walking around in the morning making hot drinks and breakfast. Being able to wear the Patagon at night in camp knowing I am warming my sleeping bag is another nice feature. Having to completely remove the Patagon for nightly bathroom calls is a downside for me. It may be handy to have at least one pocket to hold tissues or other items.

This test is now concluded. Thank you to Selk'Bag and BackpackGearTest.org for this testing opportunity.

This report was created with the BackpackGearTest.org Report Writer Version 1. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

Read more reviews of Selkbag gear
Read more gear reviews by Frances Penn

Reviews > Sleep Gear > Sleeping Bags > Selkbag Patagon Sleep System > Test Report by Frances Penn



Product tested and reviewed in each Formal Test Report has been provided free of charge by the manufacturer to BackpackGearTest.org. Upon completion of the Test Series the writer is permitted to keep the product. Owner Reviews are based on product owned by the reviewer personally unless otherwise noted.

If you are an avid backpacker, we are always looking for enthusiastic, quality reviewers. Apply here to be a gear tester.


All material on this site is the exclusive property of BackpackGearTest.org.
BackpackGearTest software copyright David Anderson