BackpackGearTest
  Home Guest - Not logged in 

Reviews > Sleep Gear > Summer Bags and Liners > MEC Silk Bag Liner > Owner Review by Andrea Murland

MEC Silk Bag Liner Mummy
Owner Review by Andrea Murland
February 1, 2011

Tester Information

Name: Andrea Murland
Email: amurland AT shaw DOT ca
Age: 25
Location: Elkford, British Columbia, Canada
Gender: Female
Height: 5 ft 2 in (1.57 m)
Weight: 125 lb (57 kg)

I began hiking frequently in 2006 and have since hiked in Western Canada, Australia, and spent 2 months backpacking in the Alps. I spend most weekends either day-hiking or on 2-3 day backpacking trips, with some longer trips when I can manage them. I also snowshoe and ski in the winter, but don’t have a lot of experience with winter in the backcountry yet. Elevation is typically 500-3,000 m (1,600-10,000 ft), in the Canadian Rockies and the Selkirk, Purcell, and Monashee ranges. I try for a light pack, but I don’t consider myself a lightweight backpacker.

Product Information

Manufacturer: Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC)
Manufacturer's URL: www.mec.ca
Year of Manufacture: Purchased 2008
Model: Silk Bag Liner Mummy
MSRP: CAD $52.00 (size Small)
Sizes Available: Small, Regular, Long
Size Reviewed: Small
Listed Weight: 175 g (6.2 oz) size Regular
Measured Weight: 163 g (5.8 oz)
Measured Length: approximately 180 cm (71 in)
Measured Width: approximately 64 cm (25 in) at widest point

Description

The MEC Silk Bag Liner is a mummy-shaped sleeping bag liner made from 100% silk. It is sewn into a mummy shape with seams along both edges and through the footbox. The liner has a hood, and the manufacturer specifies that it has a pillow sleeve. I guess that’s what the big flap at the top of the hood is for; I don’t use a pillow so I wrap that flap around my head. It has a stuff sack sewn into the side seam near the top of the body. The size small is specified to fit people up to 5 ft 6 in (168 cm) tall, the medium for people up to 6 ft (183 cm) tall, and the long for people up to 6 ft 6 in (198 cm) tall.

Because the liner has an opening only at the head end, I slide into it from the top. I am shorter than the liner, so I usually wrap the hood part of the liner (the pillow sleeve, actually) around my head, and it can comfortably cover my face if I want. The liner packs tightly into its stuff sack without really any extra space at all.

MEC Silk Bag Liner

Field Conditions

I purchased the MEC Silk Bag Liner in 2008 and have used it most times I’ve slept in a sleeping bag since. I’ve slept approximately 35 nights with the liner in a 0 C (32 F) sleeping bag and about 10 nights in a -12 C (10 F) sleeping bag. In addition, I have used it in hostels for about 15 nights. As a guess, I think the coldest I’ve used the liner in is about -5 C (23 F) or a bit colder. I have worn a variety of layers while using the liner and sleeping bag combinations – everything from a t-shirt and shorts to long underwear with a fleece, socks, rain gear, and a toque.

I have washed the liner about 10 times, in the washing machine, with regular detergent. It has been hung to dry each time.

Review

Warmth & Comfort:
I love using my silk liner. I would have frozen backpacking in Europe without it. Actually, I was cold anyway, but the few nights I didn’t use the liner I could definitely feel the difference. Even when it’s warm out and I don’t really need it for warmth, I still use it because I know that I can throw it in the wash when I get home, unlike my sleeping bag. It’s nice knowing that I’m keeping my sleeping bag a little cleaner after several days of sweating in the bush. I also find the liner very soft and comfortable to sleep in. It’s like being wrapped in a silky cocoon...which I guess is exactly what it’s doing. I often cover my face to preserve warmth, and if it’s not too cold I prefer to cover it only with the liner. That still keeps in some of the heat from my breath, without making me feel like I’m slowly suffocating in my sleeping bag.

Avoiding getting up
In the tent
User Friendliness:
The liner is easy to slide in and out of. I usually slide into the liner and then into my sleeping bag, though if I’ve been in the same place for a night already and the liner is already in my bag I’ll just slide into both at the same time. I rarely unzip my sleeping bag very much, so sliding into the liner from the top isn’t that strange or inconvenient for me.

I roll around in my sleeping bag, so I usually roll with the liner. I’m sometimes a tangled mess in the liner in the morning, but my sleeping bag doesn’t end up all twisted if I’m using the liner, which is a bonus.

Since I usually have my head and face covered with the silk liner, it provides a convenient place to hide in the morning and pretend that I’m still asleep so that I don’t have to get up.

Durability:
I haven’t had any problems with the durability of the liner. The seams are all still intact, though upon closer inspection I see a couple of loose threads. The liner, being white, has gathered a few stains since I purchased it, but otherwise is in great shape.

Summary

The MEC Silk Bag Liner Mummy is a silk sleeping bag liner which comes with an attached stuff sack. It is soft, comfortable, helps keep my sleeping bag clean, and adds extra warmth for cool nights.

Thumbs Up:
Adds warmth to my sleeping bag
Machine washable and keeps my sleeping bag clean
Soft and comfortable

Thumbs Down:
I get tangled up in it after rolling around all night



Read more reviews of MEC gear
Read more gear reviews by Andrea Murland

Reviews > Sleep Gear > Summer Bags and Liners > MEC Silk Bag Liner > Owner Review by Andrea Murland



Product tested and reviewed in each Formal Test Report has been provided free of charge by the manufacturer to BackpackGearTest.org. Upon completion of the Test Series the writer is permitted to keep the product. Owner Reviews are based on product owned by the reviewer personally unless otherwise noted.

If you are an avid backpacker, we are always looking for enthusiastic, quality reviewers. Apply here to be a gear tester.


All material on this site is the exclusive property of BackpackGearTest.org.
BackpackGearTest software copyright David Anderson